News Too Real: There were more fentanyl drug overdoses and deaths during the COVID-19 pandemic

Producer host Julia Dudley Najieb reviews the fentanyl epidemic in California


By ONME Newswire



News Too Real April 4, 2022: In episode 5 of season 4, producer host Julia Dudley Najieb reviews the Tuesday, May 3, 2022, Special Elections in Livermore along with discussing the crucial headline concerning the fentanyl epidemic in California.
In part 2, Dudley Najieb will review the statistics concerning the increase of fentanyl use and overdoses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

FRESNO, CA -- U.S. Attorney Phillip A. Talbert and Homeland Security Investigations Special Agent in Charge Tatum King announced the results of an investigation into fentanyl-related overdoses in the Fresno area, which resulted in charges against of a total of 18 drug traffickers, charging them with trafficking fentanyl powder, fentanyl pills, cocaine, and methamphetamine.


According to court documents, the investigation began after a series of fentanyl-pill overdoses in the Fresno area. These overdoses were caused by counterfeit oxycodone M30 tablets containing fentanyl, referred to on the street as M30s. Similar to authentic oxycodone M30 tablets, they are small, round, and light blue or green in color with “M” stamped on one side and “30” on the other. The investigation, dubbed “Operation Killer High,” aimed to search for the drug dealers believed to have supplied the toxic pills that caused the recent spike in fentanyl-related overdoses. The operation uncovered a large drug-trafficking ring led by Horacio Torrecillas Urias Jr., the self-proclaimed “M30 king of Fresno.”


According to the criminal complaint, Torrecillas Urias Jr. was obtaining, directly from sources in Mexico, tens of thousands of counterfeit M30 fentanyl pills and large quantities of fentanyl powder, cocaine and methamphetamine. He and his co-defendants were then distributing these illicit narcotics to drug dealers inside and outside of California. During the investigation, federal, state, and local law enforcement agents conducted traffic stops, intercepted packages, and executed residential search warrants that resulted in the recovery of over 55,000 M30 fentanyl pills, 6 pounds of fentanyl powder, 10 pounds of methamphetamine, a pound of cocaine, 25 firearms, and hundreds of rounds of ammunition.


San Francisco Gate news article: A group of mothers is calling on San Francisco city officials to crack down on people openly dealing and using drugs on city streets with a bold message that went up in Union Square on Monday afternoon.


Mothers Against Drug Deaths paid for a billboard that reads: "Famous the world over for our brains, beauty and now, dirt-cheap fentanyl.”


The message is referring to the opiate that has flooded the city's street drug marketplace in recent years, intensifying the peril of addiction and leading to a staggering number of overdose deaths.


Fentanyl is a potent synthetic opioid that can be up to 100 times more powerful than morphine, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration says. A respiratory depressant, the drug can impact a user's ability to breathe.


The drug was created in the 1960s to manage pain after surgery, and its clinical use expanded in the 1990s with the introduction of the extended release patch that is typically used to treat advanced cancer pain. Illicit fentanyl started appearing on San Francisco streets in 2018, and is often mixed with other drugs such as heroin and cocaine to increase potency.


News Too Real Podcast 4-4-22 Headlines:


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