2022 Juneteenth Special - CMAC.jpg
2022 Juneteenth Special-North Bay Area.jpg

New Tool Helps Track, Document Rise in Hate Incidents


Since the 2016 election there has been an alarming increase in reports of hate incidents around the country. Reports range from vandalism and hate-fueled graffiti to physical attacks and shootings. The reports come amid heightened fear and anxiety within immigrant and minority communities, fueled by the rhetoric of the campaign, and by statements and policies from the current administration. Experts note such fear helps to tamp down reporting of hate crimes, which are already vastly underreported. Ethnic media have long been attuned to such incidents, particularly when members of their own communities are the victims. NAM has been working with our ethnic media partners to help expand visibility of their reporting on hate crimes and hate-related incidents. You can see that coverage by visiting NAM’s Tracking Hate page. NAM has also worked to help inform ethnic media on how to report and cover hate-related incidents. But when it comes to accurately documenting hate, there is in fact no national system in place. The FBI maintains its Uniform Crime Reporting Program which is slow to update and relies on reports from law enforcement agencies that may or – as is often the case – may not report such crimes. The Southern Poverty Law Center, meanwhile, has operated its own database, though verification of claims by victims, witnesses and the media has been an issue, with some claims having been proven false. Which is why NAM